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Date: 19th February, 2020
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Anger Management Classes: Avoiding Liability for Workplace Violence

Approximately two million violent crimes occur at work each year, and workplace violence costs employers more than $4 billion annually. Despite these numbers, many employers do not consider violence to be a realistic threat to their workplaces. Recent incidents, however, have focused national attention on this growing problem.

     Employers may face significant legal liability for not taking adequate steps to prevent workplace violence. In some cases, an employer's liability for violence can extend beyond the workplace. Employers should consult with employment counsel to create a "zero-tolerance" workplace violence policy that prohibits violence, intimidation, threats, verbal abuse, harassment, profanity and other disruptive and potentially dangerous behavior.

    While employers cannot guarantee that their working environments will be free of all violence, they should avail themselves of measures to avoid or discover such problems before incurring significant liability.

    This article appeared in the June 2006 issue of Construction Business Owner.

Source: E. Jewelle Johnson link

Anger is an emotion related to one's psychological interpretation of having been offended, wronged or denied and a tendency to undo that by retaliation. James Baker describes anger as a normal emotion that involves a strong uncomfortable and emotional response to a perceived provocation. R. Novaco recognized three modalities of anger: cognitive (appraisals), somatic affective (tension and agitations) and behavioral (withdrawal and antagonism). DeFoore. W 2004 describes anger as a pressure cooker, we can only apply pressure against our anger for a certain amount of time until it explodes. Anger may have physical correlates such as increased heart rate, blood pressure, and levels of adrenaline and noradrenalin. Some view anger as part of the fight or flight brain response to the perceived threat of harm. Anger becomes the predominant feeling behaviorally, cognitively, and physiologically when a person makes the conscious choice to take action to immediately stop the threatening behavior of another outside force. The English term originally comes from the term anger of Old Norse language. Anger can have many physical and mental consequences. The external expression of anger can be found in facial expressions, body language, physiological responses, and at times in public acts of aggression. Humans and animals for example make loud sounds, attempt to look physically larger, bare their teeth, and stare. The behaviors associated with anger are designed to warn aggressors to stop their threatening behavior. Rarely does a physical altercation occur without the prior expression of anger by at least one of the participants. While most of those who experience anger explain its arousal as a result of "what has happened to them," psychologists point out that an angry person can be very well mistaken because anger causes a loss in self-monitoring capacity and objective observability. Modern psychologists view anger as a primary, natural, and mature emotion experienced by virtually all humans at times, and as something that has functional value for survival. Anger can mobilize psychological resources for corrective action. Uncontrolled anger can, however, negatively affect personal or social well-being. While many philosophers and writers have warned against the spontaneous and uncontrolled fits of anger, there has been disagreement over the intrinsic value of anger. Dealing with anger has been addressed in the writings of the earliest philosophers up to modern times. Modern psychologists, in contrast to the earlier writers, have also pointed out the possible harmful effects of suppression of anger. Displays of anger can be used as a manipulation strategy for social influence.


 
 
 
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